Advertisement

A pandemic Olympics, without all the crowds: What gets lost?

Alison Gibson and Krysta Palmer of the United States' compete during the Women's Synchronized...
Alison Gibson and Krysta Palmer of the United States' compete during the Women's Synchronized 3m Springboard Final at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, July 25, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)(Dmitri Lovetsky | AP)
Published: Aug. 1, 2021 at 7:40 PM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

(AP) - TOKYO (AP) - At their halfway point, the Tokyo Olympics are still grappling with the fact that there are no crowds.

But looking at the Games without fans is an opportunity to examine what spectators add to a public entertainment event, and what their absence takes away.

Olympic organizers say the essence of the Games will remain the same.

But without any crowds, even the television audience, which represents so much of the money made by the Olympics, is affected.

In the words of one media scholar, we like to watch things with crowds because they make it easier to pretend we’re there ourselves.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.